Embark Partners with the Headlands to present Grad Fellow Show

The 2016-2017 Headlands Graduate Fellows explore the modes and methods of art practices in a multitude of ways. 

Saturday, May 20th through Wednesday, June 7.
Opening Reception: Sunday, May 21st, 1–4PM.

No End in Sight presents the work and practices of Headlands’ 2016–17 Graduate Fellows. In the spirit of the organization’s history of encouraging artistic exploration and experimentation, this exhibition travels the path of an idea to fruition, taking various routes and perspectives. What happens when we begin to understand an art practice as an evolution rather than a result-oriented endeavor? Whether it be with meticulous research, collection of scientific data, sketches as preparation for acts of chance, the organic development of the handmade, thinking through digital culture via analog devices, or the act of autobiographical documentation, No End in Sight asks fruitful questions rather than presenting final answers.

Curatorial Statement

By Tania Houtzager & Angelica Jardini

In an increasingly commodified art world, No End In Sight aims to refocus our attentions from the product to the process of seven artists who have been thinking through their own practice and its place at the Headlands Center for the Arts. This exhibition reveals how these artists approach problems, think through complex subjects, and eventually decide how best to present their findings and creations to the public. While their results are quite varied, Shannon Abac, Jose Figueroa, Kunlin He, Cy Keener, Nicole Lavelle, Holden Schultz, and Angela Willetts all take us on conceptual journeys through their unique modus operandi.

Nicole Lavelle, 2017

Nicole Lavelle, 2017

Inspired by Headlands’ coastal location, the work of Cy Keener and Nicole Lavelle both probe for information from the land and the sea. Keener roots his process in scientific research and the poetic ephemeral. His handmade buoys, launched into the ocean and tracked by GPS, are designed to send measurements of waves and the color of the sky back to his studio. Prototypes, sketches, molds, and photographs show how the artist developed his objects, and how they remain in open-ended progress. Lavelle also utilizes research in her practice, on both cultural and personal levels, to create compelling narratives. Using an old family cabin as a starting point, Lavelle interweaves facets of her own life into an interpretive investigation of land use, housing, culture, and community in Marin County. Her experimental visual essay will turn social practice project as she performs a live lecture in which she guides the audience through the complexities and eccentricities of this site in contemporary California.

Kunlin He, 2017

Kunlin He, 2017

Like Keener and Lavelle, Kunlin He and Jose Figueroa use fact-based research to reimagine the historical through a personal lens. Kunlin He focuses on Headlands’ military history, interweaving Chinese folk tales with his findings to question preconceived notions of fixed chronology. The result is a unique amalgam of fact and fiction, presented via traditional Chinese ink painting techniques and contemporary installation. Jose Figueroa similarly explores personal history through autobiographical paintings that act as a vibrant diary, providing insight to the artist’s inner life and thought process. Together, the paintings become a symbolic archive, full of talismans of specific places and times that simultaneously form the basis of a potentially life-long project.

Holden Schultz, 2017

Holden Schultz, 2017

Angela Willetts, Shannon Abac, and Holden Schultz each explore the potentialities of their mediums. Willetts tests the boundaries of objects and subjects in video documentation methods of her performance practice. Through the relationship between her body and various materials, she deconstructs the binary of the self and other, and opens a dialogue with endless possibilities. While her performances originate as dedicated tasks, the act of doing subsumes her original goals. Abac also explicitly presents the effects of working processes in her large sculptural vessels with accompanying maquettes. The elements of chance and risk are clearly rendered, presented as the results of experiments with an array of materials, thus expanding the definition of ceramic art. Schultz disassembles and reconstructs obsolete technology—including projectors, cameras, and scanners—into functional objects, ultimately reimagining the ways that photography might provide new ways of seeing. At its most powerful, Schultz’s work presents a reinvention of image creation through an ingenious hybridity of the old and new. His work, like all of the artists’ works in the exhibition, is dedicated to imagining new paths, connections, and horizons.


About The Graduate Fellowship Program

Headlands’ Graduate Fellowships is a year-long studio program for recent MFA graduates in partnership with esteemed Bay Area academic institutions. Graduate Fellows are given the support of a private studio, public presentation opportunities, and participation in Headlands’ peer-to-peer community of local, national, and international artists.

This event is part of the Headlands's off-site program series while their campus is currently closed to the public for construction on The Commons. The Headlands is co-presenting and collaborating with several Bay Area cultural organizations and partners; see all off-site events here.

Announcing our Fort Mason Young Artist Summer Program

Announcing our Fort Mason Young Artist Summer Program

Embark Arts is thrilled to announce its first education program, Fort Mason Young Artists Summer Program! In partnership with the City College of San Francisco, this program offers two week-long summer classes to middle and high school students taught by current and recently graduated MFA students. These classes give the students the opportunity to work with emerging artists, learn about aspects of those artists' practices, and participate in a pop-up show at Embark Gallery! For the MFA student teachers, it provides a chance to gain teaching experience through the institution of City College and to match their practices to middle and high school pedagogy.

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Embark Gallery Opens Spread and Celebrates Expansion

Seven emerging artists explore the theme of growth in updated gallery

Carmina Eliason, photograph of Café con Leche, an ongoing project. "Conversation Residues (Detail Shot)" Herbert Sanders Gallery, San Jose. November 2016

Carmina Eliason, photograph of Café con Leche, an ongoing project. "Conversation Residues (Detail Shot)" Herbert Sanders Gallery, San Jose. November 2016

Embark Arts is proud to announce a 300 sq. ft. addition to Embark Gallery. In honor of Embark’s expansion, Spread will explore the theme of growth. Ideas of change, improvement, transformation, transition, multiplying, metamorphosis and/or modification permeate this show. From urban sprawl to illness, mimesis and the social practice of sharing ideas, Spread addresses a variety of subjects through installation, performance and other innovative processes.

Amy Cella comments upon the endlessly duplicated and modified dissemination of images in the digital realm through a mimetic photographic process. Carmina Eliason presents Café con Leche, a social practice project that encourages participants to discuss issues of race and ethnicity in a communal setting, over a spread of coffee, milk and shared stories. Matthew Floriani and Amber Imrie-Situnayake both address the concepts of home and shelter. Floriani’s dilapidated miniature neighborhood evokes issues of gentrification and the uneven distribution of wealth, while Imrie-Situnayake’s installation work aims to blur the line between the domestic and the wild, reminding us of humankind’s impending and inevitable collapse back into nature.

Amber Imrie- Situnayake. Homeland, 2017. Photography printed on canvas, thread, branches, rocks, buckets.

Amber Imrie- Situnayake. Homeland, 2017. Photography printed on canvas, thread, branches, rocks, buckets.

Gianna Paniagua’s large-scale sculptures made of intricately cut paper reflect on the rapid cell growth of disease and the fragility of the human body. On opening night, Paniagua will reveal her process in a cathartic live performance piece. Meganne Rosen’s work explores the fluid relationship between painting and sculpture. Her installation, a “sprawling organism” that consumes the gallery, is site-specific and will be shown for the first time.

Embark Gallery offers exhibition opportunities to graduate students of the Fine Arts in the San Francisco Bay Area. We provide a space for an engaged community of artists, curators and scholars, and we aim to expand the audience for up and coming contemporary art. The juried exhibitions are held at our gallery in San Francisco at the historic Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture.

Press Previews by appointment.

Opening Reception: April 7, 6-9 pm

Hours: 12–5pm every Saturday and Sunday, April 8 - May 7

Media Contact: Angelica Jardini, Curatorial Director: angelica@embarkgallery.com

 

Accepted Artists for Spread and F

Embark is pleased to present the artists for our upcoming shows Spread and F. These shows were juried by Aimee Le Duc, Donna Napper and Sarah Thibault.

Spread 04.07.17-05.07.17

Amy Cella. Installation view of Search and Destroy, Just Be Careful in the Corner and You Move Fast, I Count Slow, 2017. Inkjet prints in 33 black plastic frames.

Amy Cella. Installation view of Search and Destroy, Just Be Careful in the Corner and You Move Fast, I Count Slow, 2017. Inkjet prints in 33 black plastic frames.

Amy Cella | SF State

Carmina Eliason | San Jose State

Matthew Floriani | Mills

Amber Imrie- Situnayake | Stanford

Gianna Paniagua | CCA

Meganne Rosen | CCA

 

F 06.16.17-07.22.17

Tamara Porras. Making a Dad, 2017, Archival Pigment Prints from found 35mm slides.

Tamara Porras. Making a Dad, 2017, Archival Pigment Prints from found 35mm slides.

Whitney Aguiniga | Mills

Keith Daly | San Jose State 

Flavia D’Euros | CCA 

Mattson Fields | Mills

Tamara Porras | CCA

Meganne Rosen | CCA

Embark Expansion to Open in April

We are pleased to announce that Embark Arts is expanding! Embark Gallery will be closed for the month of March for construction as we tear down our north facing wall of the gallery to extend our space to the end of the building! The gallery will grow by a couple of hundred feet gaining another window and the rest of the space will become a new conference room that will be available to rent through Fort Mason. 

We will reopen in the month of April with a celebratory juried show called Spread, named for the growing space and programming that we are rolling our this year! We look forward to sharing our new space with you as well as all of the programs we have planned for its future!

Embark Gallery Opens Get Lost Exhibition

Local Emerging Artists Present Contemporary Perspectives on Queer Identity

Simon Garcia-Miñaur, Welcome to Introduction to Fractal Sex (Video still), 2015, HD video, Single Channel

Simon Garcia-Miñaur, Welcome to Introduction to Fractal Sex (Video still), 2015, HD video, Single Channel

Inspired by philosopher Herbert Marcuse's notion of "the great refusal," Embark’s latest exhibition Get Lost showcases contemporary takes on queer identity politics. By challenging the representational imagery that queer art is perhaps best known for, these artists present a new understanding of the self through displacement and absence, suggesting that queer activism in the digital age may take more nuanced forms of expression.

The video work of Simón Garcia-Miñaur (SFAI) features the inaccessible body, mystifying the shared sexual experience and using technology to speak to invisibility in queer relationships. These short fiction films deny the viewer access to their preconceived notions of human interaction and sex, further queering the queer body through digital rendering. Courtney Trouble (CCA) also uses techniques of erasure politically, literally grinding up photographs of queer bodies and spaces into dust. Through this transformation of subject to object to abstraction, she takes the medium of photography which is so essential to the history of queer art, and makes it fragile, fleeting and thoroughly unrecognizable.

Izidora Leber (SFAI) presents a textual piece in several forms: spoken word, video and installation. The work, titled A rumination of the queer body in documentary and video making history - and suggestions of how to get lost as a concept for identitarian escape is informed by the idea of hybridity and aims to disrupt normative categorizations of identity. Richard-Jonathan Nelson challenges the assumed roles of black queer bodies via vibrantly colored textiles. His digital collages and soft sculptures refuse heteronormative ideals and present a multifaceted and nuanced perspective on queer masculinity and racial power structures in the queer community.

This exhibition was juried by Avram Finkelstein, a founding member of the collective responsible for the Silence=Death poster, and of the art collective, Gran Fury, with whom he collaborated on public art commissions for international institutions including The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Venice Biennale, ArtForum, MOCA LA, The New Museum, and The Public Art Fund.


Embark Gallery offers exhibition opportunities to graduate students of the Fine Arts in the San Francisco Bay Area. We provide a space for an engaged community of artists, curators and scholars, and we aim to expand the audience for up and coming contemporary art. The juried exhibitions are held at our gallery in San Francisco at the historic Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture.

Press Preview: Wednesday, January 25 [by appointment]

Opening Reception: Friday, January 27, 5-9 PM

Hours: 12–5pm every Saturday and Sunday from January 28 to March 4, and during the week by appointment.

 

 

Media Contact:

Tania Houtzager

tania@embarkgallery.com